Tue, 16 May
Six Basic Hydroponic Systems There are four basic methods of hydroponic or soilless gardening – active, passive, recovery, and non-recovery – and six basic hydroponic systems which each function differently, but in all cases the plants receive their nutrients via some form of water (hydro) delivery system: drip (recovery or non-recovery), wick, water culture, ebb and flow or flood and drain, nutrient film technique (NFT), or aeroponic. Drip Growing Systems One of the most common forms of hydroponics, recirculating or “recovery” drip growing systems recycle the excess nutrient solution from a reservoir. A timer controls a submersed pump which drips nutrient solution onto the base of each plant via a small drip line. Wick System Maybe the simplest hydroponic system, the wick system involves no moving parts and can use a variety of growing media. In all cases the nutrient solution gets released onto the growing tray and delivered to the roots throug...
Tue, 16 May
Six Basic Hydroponic Systems There are four basic methods of hydroponic or soilless gardening – active, passive, recovery, and non-recovery – and six basic hydroponic systems which each function differently, but in all cases the plants receive their nutrients via some form of water (hydro) delivery system: drip (recovery or non-recovery), wick, water culture, ebb and flow or flood and drain, nutrient film technique (NFT), or aeroponic. Drip Growing Systems One of the most common forms of hydroponics, recirculating or “recovery” drip growing systems recycle the excess nutrient solution from a reservoir. A timer controls a submersed pump which drips nutrient solution onto the base of each plant via a small drip line. Wick System Maybe the simplest hydroponic system, the wick system involves no moving parts and can use a variety of growing media. In all cases the nutrient solution gets released onto the growing tray and delivered to the roots throug...
Mon, 15 May
When setting up an indoor garden, air circulation and exhaust are just as important to your overall plant’s health as water and light. A successful gardener can use airflow to control temperature and humidity, which will help prevent disease and eliminate hot spots. So…what’s the best way to set up your exhaust? Keep in mind that hot air rises, so the best place to set up your outgoing air is at the top of your room, and intake should be closer to the floor where the air is cooler. It’s important to note that an intake fan is not always necessary; a passive intake can work well in some gardens (passive intake occurs without a fan—the exhaust fan creates negative pressure in the room and naturally draws in fresh air).